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 Weed of the Month
*MEADOW HAWKWEED*
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WHAT DOES IT LOOK LIKE?
 This plant has shallow, fibrous roots, stolons, and rhizomes. The basal leaves are dark green on the upper side and a lighter green below, spatula shaped and about 6" in length. Both the stems and the leaves are covered with hair. The rosettes of this plant produce 10 to 25 stems that can grow up to 3' in height. The stems usually do not have any leaves, and if they do, one single small leaf occurs at the mid point of the stem. If severed, both the leaves and the stem secrete a white, milky juice.

hieraciumcaespitosum

hawek

THE PROBLEM?
One stem can produce 5 to 30 flower heads; flowers are bright yellow to white in color and are 1/2" in diameter. One characteristic that makes this plant so hard to control is that it can spread and reproduce by stolons and rhizomes, creating thick dense mats of vegetation.

meadow hawkweed

OTHER FACTS:
Meadow Hawkweed blooms from June to August. It typically inhabits mountain meadows, forest clearings, pastures, hayfields, roadsides, abandoned farmland and other disturbed sites. The species is thought to have been introduced into the United States in 1828 as a medicinal remedy to cure digestive ailments.

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WALLOWA COUNTY VEGETATION DEPARTMENT
541-426-4543 ext. 206
wcweeds@co.wallowa.or.us